MPI Tech joins the Global Graphics Software Partner Network

MPI Tech joins the Global Graphics Software Partner Network

Leading provider of document management and document output solutions MPI Tech has joined the Global Graphics Software Partner Network as a technology partner.

MPI Tech will enable Global Graphics Software’s Harlequin Direct™ and Fundamentals™ products to support AFP and IPDS  jobs. AFP (Advanced Function Presentation) is the most widely used format for high-speed transactional printing in many industries including finance, insurance, manufacturing, health care and education. IPDS (Intelligent Printer Data Stream) is the print description language (PDL) to print AFP documents online.

MPI Tech offers a range of solutions to process AFPDS and native AFP/IPDS at speeds over 6,000 ipm or convert them into the most popular PDL (PCL, PDF, PDF/A, PS etc) on almost every platform (Windows, AIX, Linux, Solaris, UNIX).

Justin Bailey, managing director of Global Graphics Software commented: “We’re pleased to welcome MPI Tech to our partner network. With a proven technology and know-how for processing AFP or IPDS print jobs, Global Graphics Software turns to MPI Tech as its ‘go-to partner’ when our customers require solutions for these transactional print data-streams.”

MPI Tech has been a licensee of Global Graphics technology for many years, using it for converting to, and processing, PostScript, PDF, and other PDLs.

Image Access joins the Global Graphics Software Partner Network

Image Access offers book, flatbed, sheetfeed, duplex & art scanners for digitizing large format originals for archives, libraries, museums & industry.
Image Access offers book, flatbed, sheetfeed, duplex & art scanners for digitizing large format originals for archives, libraries, museums & industry.

Leading German scanner manufacturer Image Access GmbH has joined the Global Graphics Software Partner Network as a technology partner. The two companies began working together last year to develop a solution that would enable printer vendors to implement a new family of Image Access line scan bars called WideSCAN into their printers to support the creation of PrintFlat™ calibrations. The WideSCAN scan bars, together with PrintFlat, will dramatically increase print quality with minimal impact on overall production time.

PrintFlat technology maximizes the print quality of your printer by addressing common defects found in inkjet printing, including banding and stripes, as well as mottling, streaking and chaining. By adding PrintFlat to a print workflow it helps to boost printer sales and reduce support calls for OEMs by expanding the range of printable jobs and consistently achieving exceptional image quality.

For the PrintFlat process to work, printed target pages need to be scanned and the resultant image data fed into the PrintFlat solution. This is where the Image Access partnership comes into play: the WideSCAN scan bars will be available in various sizes in 12-inch increments, starting at 24 inches, and are the most compact and easy-to-use line scan bars in the industry.

Justin Bailey, managing director of Global Graphics Software commented: “Image Access are known for their experience and innovative use of emerging camera technologies and I’m really pleased to welcome them to our Partner Network. Introducing the new WideSCAN scan bar is a game changer for printer manufacturers. Now they will be able to implement the scan bar into the printer so that calibration and PrintFlat correction can all be done inline on the printer, making that device PrintFlat Ready.”

Image Access has manufactured wide format scanners, including brands Bookeye® and WideTEK®, for more than 25 years.

A passion for software development

If you’re a recent mathematics or computer science graduate, or have a year or two of real software development experience, then we want to hear from you.

 Henry Sanderson, Software Engineer at Global Graphics Software

Meet Henry Sanderson, software engineer at Global Graphics Software. Henry joined us in 2019 on our graduate scheme.

What is your background?

My programming journey started at A-level where I first took an interest in the subject, never having had a formal opportunity to study it before. I followed the path all the way through to graduating with a first-class degree in Computer Games from the University of Essex.

What was the graduate  scheme selection day like?

The day was built around a specific task, which was both fun and challenging. There were some surprises, but they were integral to the experience so they could see how we’d react, which was interesting to say the least. For example, we were working in groups, but we weren’t given much in the way of source control, to see how we’d cope merging our work together at the end. It was a cool way to introduce some chaos.

Tell us a bit about your Global Graphics Graduate Program experience

The scheme is separated into three sections where each is spent in a different discipline of QA, Support, and Development, each lasting about four months. There’s also an initial period where you’re taught the basics and get to integrate with the company for a bit. You learn quite a few tricks that’ll be useful too, one of which being how to use ReSharper to speed up your overall pace of working. I initially thought I’d only be interested in development, but I was enlightened to the other two disciplines in a way that I enjoyed. I was involved in meaningful projects the whole way, so there’s no feeling of apathy since everything you do is useful to the company.

For QA, we were tasked to investigate a new way of implementing UI testing that would be competitive to the current choice, and the result of that was a successful integration of a new UI testing library that was significantly cheaper and didn’t require juggling licenses between PCs.

What has been your experience since graduating the program?

I graduated the program feeling pretty good about my progress made during my time here. I entered this company with very little C++ knowledge and below-average C# knowledge, and on graduation I felt that I was a lot more competent at both, as well as skills beyond just knowing languages: using source control, exploring the parts of IDEs that I took for granted while studying at university and using programs that I’d never even heard of before joining. I’ve definitely grown as a person too. I’m now a developer on the Direct™ product team, which has been a rigorous trial by fire by diving head-first into a C++ codebase. I am certainly happy with where I am in the company now and want to continue to develop myself as a member of the team.

How would you describe the support you received from your mentorship team?

The support I received was instrumental in my development here. It was hugely effective, with just the right amount of assistance given so that it neither felt like handholding nor isolating.

What’s the best thing about working at Global Graphics Software?

The flexibility is amazing. The workday isn’t a fixed block of time, it’s whatever you want it to be (within reason). The ethos is basically “as long as the work gets done, and you turn up to meetings, work however long you want”, which is a boon to someone like me who has trouble getting out of bed promptly.

What is the environment like?

The office in Cambourne has a roomy atmosphere with lots of natural light, with a well-stocked kitchen to handle our metabolic needs. There’s also a huge expanse of green space outside the office too, which is perfect for going for mind-clearing walks.

What is the most exciting thing about your work?

I’m in it for the knowledge gained, since in under two years I feel like my skills have increased greatly. Every task I pick up offers the chance to enrich my understanding somewhere.

How have you found working remotely?

Before the pandemic, I very rarely worked from home, but now having done it consecutively every day since early March, I’m very much used to it and don’t think I could return to normal. The company has really embraced working from home and have implemented the systems required to make it work well, to the point that I don’t really feel disadvantaged from the situation imposed on me.

Have you taken part in any of the social events?

I’m a fan of the board game nights that were picking up steam shortly before lockdown, as well as the Shed meetups.

What advice would you give this year’s graduates?

As long as you have the enthusiasm to learn and grow, and can go with the flow, there’s nothing to really worry about. ‘Don’t suffer in silence’ is the mantra to grow here. Ask questions when you get stuck or if you need something explained.

If you’re interested in joining the Global Graphics Software Graduate Program visit our web page to find out more:
https://www.globalgraphics.com/company/careers/graduate-program

Shade and color variation in textile printing – why it’s important and what you can do about it

Printing soft furnishings

With fewer design limitations, a faster turnaround, no minimum run length and higher margins (not to mention reduced use of power and water, and of pollution), it’s not surprising that the digitally printed textile market is growing.1 Inkjet has certainly made textile design and printing much more flexible than screen printing – and that goes for everybody involved, from the designer through the printing company, to the buyer.

But printing textiles on inkjet doesn’t come without its challenges: as a software provider focusing on print quality issues, we often hear from print service providers who can only digitally print two thirds of the jobs they receive because they would not be paid for the quality they could achieve on the others.

Shade or color variation is a common problem. It’s not new in digital printing (it’s always been an issue for screen-printed and dyed textiles as well) and is usually managed by providing a shade band, which printer operators refer to, to check allowable color variations between pieces.

But, unlike screen-printing or dyeing, the color variation on an inkjet press can be visible over a small distance, just a few centimeters, and this results in visible bands across the output. Banding describes features that tend to be 1 – 10 cm across and they’re often caused by variation of inkjet pressure or voltage differences within the head, which typically results in a frown or smile shape. We also see a certain amount of manufacturing variation between heads so that one may print lighter or darker than the head next to it in a print bar. Some types of heads can also wear in use, which can result in less regular banding that can change over time. This means that large areas which should be flat color may not be.

When such a variation occurs it can greatly complicate a lot of post-print steps, especially if you need to put more than one piece of textile together, either in sewing or use (such as a pair of curtains). If that’s the case, then a significant difference may be unacceptable and your printing rejected by your buyer. Ultimately this leads to print service providers rejecting jobs, because they know their digital press can’t handle printing those tricky flat tints or smooth tones.

What can you do about it?

The first thing many companies do to try to overcome this banding is to adjust the voltage to the inkjet head, but this is often time-consuming and expensive because it requires an expert technician. A better alternative is to make the correction in software, which is a more cost-effective and faster solution. It means it can be automated and can act at a much finer granularity, so printing is more accurate. There’s no need to mess with controls that could damage the press, and printing companies themselves can make corrections without the vendor sending a technician on-site.

Our solution at Global Graphics Software for improving banding is PrintFlat™. It corrects tonality to hide banding based on measurements from the press. It adjusts every nozzle separately and doesn’t need a specialist engineer to make press adjustments. PrintFlat can be integrated into different digital front ends, using a variety of RIPs, including Caldera and Colorgate and, not to mention, our own Harlequin RIP®.

Over the years of working with many press manufacturers we’ve discovered that many technical issues and solutions are common across different sectors, including transactional, wide-format, commercial, labels and packaging, and industrial, including ceramics, wall coverings, flooring and of course textiles. That means that we already have years of experience in correcting for banding. Using PrintFlat in your press means print service providers can now take on those jobs they would normally reject.

To learn more about how to eliminate shade and color variation when printing on an inkjet press, listen to Global Graphics Software’s CTO Martin Bailey’s talk for FESPA 2020:

“New techniques to eliminate in-lot shade variation when printing textiles with inkjet.”

Or visit the PrintFlat website: https://www.printflat.com/

Further reading:

  1. What causes banding in inkjet? (And the smart software solution to fix it.)
  2. Streaks and Banding: Measuring macro uniformity in the context of optimization processes for inkjet printing

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  1. Digitally printed textiles are estimated to be between 2% – 5% of the total printed textiles market. Estimated at $146.5 billion in 2018 by Grand View Research

What’s the best effective photographic image resolution for your variable data print jobs?

It goes without saying that the final quality of your printed piece is paramount. But when speed and time constraints are also critical, what can you do to ensure your files fly through the press and still reward you with the quality you expect? Optimizing the images in the piece is a good place to start, but if you’re creating a job with variable data, where there are thousands of pages to print, each with a different image, how do you know what a sensible effective resolution is for those images that will ensure your PDF file doesn’t trip up the print production workflow?

In his latest guide, Full Speed Ahead, how to make variable data PDF files that won’t slow your digital press, Martin Bailey, CTO at Global Graphics Software, advises not to ask the print workflow to do more work than necessary if that doesn’t change the look of the printed result. Images are commonly re-used within a VDP job, so being able to process each image only once and then re-use the result many times can significantly increase the throughput of the digital front end. On the other hand, some images are personal to every recipient and must therefore be processed for every single recipient, slowing the workflow down.

Martin offers the following tips for setting appropriate effective photographic image resolutions:

  1. Aim for 300 ppi, however the most appropriate image resolution for digital presses varies, depending on printing heads, media and screening used.
  2. Bear in mind image content; soft and dreamy images can be sometimes placed at a lower resolution.
  3. Don’t use a higher effective image resolution for photographic images than the output resolution as this is often not productive. The example in Fig 1 below illustrates how easy it is to use an image at several times the required resolution:

The same 12-megapixel image at 3 different sizes

Fig 1: The same 12-megapixel (4000 x 3000 px) image placed on the page at three different sizes. Source: Full Speed Ahead, how to make variable data PDF files that won’t slow your digital press.

When an image is placed onto a page the original resolution of that image is largely irrelevant; what matters is how many pixels there are per inch on the final printed page. As an example, if you have a photograph from a 12 MP compact camera it’ll probably be approximately 3000 pixels by 4000 pixels. If that’s placed on the page as 3 inches by 4 inches (7.5 x 10cm) the effective resolution is about 1000ppi (4000/4). That would usually be about three times as much as you need in each dimension.

A variety of tools are available for optimizing image resolution, and some composition tools can also do this automatically. To find out more about the best effective resolution for your images, and to pick up more tips for optimizing your images for variable data printing, download the guide:

Full Speed Ahead: how to make variable data PDF files that won't slow your digital press edited by Global Graphics Software

Full Speed Ahead – how to make variable data PDF files that won’t slow your digital press.

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Carry out complex tasks for your print workflow easily with Mako SDK

If you’re into code, then you’ll enjoy watching the recording of our recent webinar, Sharpen the saw: a live coding demo using Mako™.

Mako is a versatile SDK for building fast, scalable solutions for your print workflow. Its unique document object model uses Mako’s C++ and C# APIs to control color, fonts, text, images, vector content, metadata and more, combining precision with performance.

In the session, principal engineer Andy Cardy uses coding in C++ and C# to show you three complex tasks that you can easily achieve with Mako:

  • PDF rendering
  • Using Mako in Cloud-ready frameworks
  • Analyzing and editing with the Mako Document Object Model

Look out for more sessions like this over the coming months.

Watch it here:

For more information about Mako, please visit globalgraphics.com/mako

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Why does optimization of VDP jobs matter?

Would you fill your brand-new Ferrari with cheap and inferior fuel? It’s a question posed by Martin Bailey in his new guide: ‘Full Speed Ahead – how to make variable data PDF files that won’t slow your digital press’. It’s an analogy he uses to explain the importance of putting well-constructed PDF files through your DFE so that they don’t disrupt the printing process and the DFE runs as efficiently as possible. 

Here are Martin’s recommendations to help you avoid making jobs that delay the printing process, so you can be assured that you’ll meet your print deadline reliably and achieve your printing goals effectively:

If you’re printing work that doesn’t make use of variable data on a digital press, you’re probably producing short runs. If you weren’t, you’d be more likely to choose an offset or flexo press instead. But “short runs” very rarely means a single copy.

Let’s assume that you’re printing, for example, 50 copies of a series of booklets, or of an imposed form of labels. In this case the DFE on your digital press only needs to RIP each PDF page once.

To continue the example, let’s assume that you’re printing on a press that can produce 100 pages per minute (or the equivalent area for labels etc.). If all your jobs are 50 copies long, you therefore need to RIP jobs at only two pages per minute (100ppm/50 copies). Once a job is fully RIPped and the copies are running on press you have plenty of time to get the next job prepared before the current one clears the press.

But VDP jobs place additional demands on the processing power available in a DFE because most pages are different to every other page and must therefore each be RIPped separately. If you’re printing at 100 pages per minute the DFE must RIP at 100 pages per minute; fifty times faster than it needed to process for fifty copies of a static job.

Each minor inefficiency in a VDP job will often only add between a few milliseconds and a second or two to the processing of each page, but those times need to be multiplied up by the number of pages in the job. An individual delay of half a second on every page of a 10,000-page job adds up to around an hour and a half for the whole job. For a really big job of a million pages it only takes an extra tenth of a second per page to add 24 hours to the total processing time.

If you’re printing at 120ppm the DFE must process each page in an average of half a second or less to keep up with the press. The fastest continuous feed inkjet presses at the time of writing are capable of printing an area equivalent to over 13,000 pages per minute, which means each page must be processed in just over 4ms. It doesn’t take much of a slow-down to start impacting throughput.

If you’re involved in this kind of calculation you may find the digital press data rate calculator at https://blog.globalgraphics.com/tag/data-rate/ useful:

Global Graphics Software’s digital press data rate calculator.
Global Graphics Software’s digital press data rate calculator.

This extra load has led DFE builders to develop a variety of optimizations. Most of these work by reducing the amount of data that must be RIPped. But even with those optimizations a complex VDP job typically requires significantly more processing power than a ‘static’ job where every copy is the same.

The amount of processing required to prepare a PDF file for print in a DFE can vary hugely without affecting the visual appearance of the printed result, depending on how it is constructed.

Poorly constructed PDF files can therefore impact a print service provider in one or both of two ways:

  • Output is not achieved at engine speed, reducing return on investment (ROI) because fewer jobs can be produced per shift. In extreme cases when printing on a continuous feed (web-fed) press a failure to deliver rasters for printing fast enough can also lead to media wastage and may confuse in-line or near-line finishing.
  • In order to compensate for jobs that take longer to process in the DFE, press vendors often provide more hardware to expand the processing capability, increasing the bill of materials, and therefore the capital cost of the DFE.

Once the press is installed and running the production manager will usually calculate and tune their understanding of how many jobs of what type can be printed in a shift. Customer services representatives work to ensure that customer expectations are set appropriately, and the company falls into a regular pattern. Most jobs are quoted on an acceptable turn-round time and delivered on schedule.

Depending on how many presses the print site has, and how they are connected to one or more DFEs this may lead to a press sitting idle, waiting for pages to print. It may also delay other jobs in the queue or mean that they must be moved to a different press. Moving jobs at the last minute may not be easy if the presses available are not identical. Different presses may require different print streams or imposition and there may be limitations on stock availability, etc.

Many jobs have tight deadlines on delivery schedules; they may need to be ready for a specific time, with penalties for late delivery, or the potential for reduced return for the marketing department behind a direct mail campaign. Brand owners may be ordering labels or cartons on a just in time (JIT) plan, and there may be consequences for late delivery ranging from an annoyed customer to penalty clauses being invoked.

Those problems for the print service provider percolate upstream to brand owners and other groups commissioning digital print. Producing an inefficiently constructed PDF file will increase the risk that your job will not be delivered by the expected time.

You shouldn’t take these recommendations as suggesting that the DFE on any press is inadequate. Think of it as the equivalent of a suggestion that you should not fill your brand-new Ferrari with cheap and inferior fuel!

 

Full Speed Ahead: how to make variable data PDF files that won't slow your digital press edited by Global Graphics Software

The above is an excerpt from Full Speed Ahead: how to make variable data PDF files that won’t slow your digital press. The guide is designed to help you avoid making jobs that disrupt and delay the printing process, increasing the probability of everyone involved in delivering the printed piece; hitting their deadlines reliably and achieving their goals effectively.

DOWNLOAD THE FREE FULL GUIDE HERE: https://bit.ly/fsa-pdf

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About the author:

Martin Bailey, CTO, Global Graphics Software
Martin Bailey, CTO, Global Graphics Software

Martin Bailey first joined what has now become Global Graphics Software in the early nineties, and has worked in customer support, development and product management for the Harlequin RIP as well as becoming the company’s Chief Technology Officer. During that time he’s also been actively involved in a number of print-related standards activities, including chairing CIP4, CGATS and the ISO PDF/X committee. He’s currently the primary UK expert to the ISO committees maintaining and developing PDF and PDF/VT.

 

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Full Speed Ahead: How to make variable data PDF files that won’t slow your digital press

The use of variable data has increased exponentially over the past five years and is emerging in new applications such as industrial inkjet. Yet poorly designed variable data PDF files disrupt production and reduce ROI.

Watch the recent webinar with Global Graphics Software’s CTO Martin Bailey, the author of Full Speed Ahead, a new guide to offer advice to anyone with a stake in variable data printing, including graphic designers, print buyers, production managers, press operators, composition tool developers and users.

In the webinar Martin presents an overview of the guide and highlights some of the key tips and tricks for graphic designers, prepress and print service providers, showing how, when they all work together, VDP jobs can fly through digital presses.

Sponsored by Delphax Solutions, Digimarc, HP Indigo, HP PageWide Industrial, HYBRID Software, Kodak, Racami and WhatTheyThink, the guide is a practical format for easy reference and includes:

• Tips and tricks for making fast, efficient PDF files for variable data printing
• Helpful illustrations, photos and explanatory diagrams
• Real examples from industry

You can download your copy here: https://www.globalgraphics.com/full-speed-ahead

For further reading about PDF documents and standards:

  1. PDF Processing Steps – the next evolution in handling technical marks

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RIP technology replacement achieves a faster development time, performance and quality benchmarks

 VIR Softech replaces RIP software for major print OEM and achieves a faster development time, performance and quality benchmarks

When a major print OEM switched from a market-leading RIP technology to the Harlequin RIP®, they achieved a faster development time and performance and quality benchmarks with a reduced bill of materials cost.

The Challenge
When a leading print OEM was looking to move to a PDF RIP technology that was easy to integrate and help to achieve quality and performance benchmarks, it contacted Global Graphics Software Partner Network member, Vir Softech. As a RIP replacement service provider, the team at Vir Softech includes experienced engineers, with experts who have worked on all the major RIP technologies and understand the interfaces and functions they offer.

The Solution
Vir Softech recommended switching from the existing RIP technology to the Harlequin RIP from Global Graphics Software. Vir Softech had experience of using the Harlequin RIP in a similar project and knew it would meet the print OEM’s requirements. After a period of evaluation, including quality and performance benchmarking, the print OEM chose to use the Harlequin RIP.

Deepak Garg, managing director at Vir Softech explains the process: “The first step towards making the change was to assess and understand the various features and functions offered by the OEM’s print devices.”

After investigating, the team prepared a design document highlighting:

  • The OEM’s product features that interact with the RIP technology
  • How these product features are implemented
  • The various RIP interfaces which are used to implement these features and functions

Deepak continues: “Once the print OEM decided to go ahead, we prepared another document highlighting how to achieve these functions using the Harlequin interfaces. Some functions or features could not be implemented using Harlequin directly, such as special color handling, spot color replacement, extraction of cut data etc., so we contacted Global Graphics Software who was able to provide a design showing how these functions could be implemented using Harlequin. We then prepared a proof-of-concept, or working implementation, which demonstrated how the Harlequin RIP would work with the print OEM’s print devices. With Harlequin, such a prototype can usually be achieved within three to six months.”

The Result
Development time was much shorter than usual for such an ambitious undertaking, greatly reducing costs and enabling the print OEM to drive their revenue earlier than originally expected. The print OEM began using the Harlequin RIP, instantly meeting its quality and performance targets.

The print OEM says: “The Harlequin RIP helped us to move to native PDF printing and achieve the performance targets for our printers. Harlequin also helped us to reduce the lead time for getting our products to market while keeping development and maintenance costs low.”

About Vir Softech
Vir Softech is a technology start-up with expertise in imaging and computer vision technologies. With a strong focus in the Print & Publishing domain, its team of experienced engineers includes experts in all aspects of imaging and RIP technologies, such as job management, job settings, color management, screening, bands generation and management, VDP and imposition etc.

The team at Vir Softech are experts in configuring RIP technologies for better performance targeted for a specific market segment such as production, commercial, large format and enterprise printing. Some of the areas where Vir Softech can help include low resource environment, implementing OEM-specific unique functions using Harlequin RIP interfaces, making use of OEM ASIC for better performance, making use of OEM hardware accelerators for some of the computer-intensive RIP operations such as color conversion, image transformations, image decoding, rendering etc and achieving PPM target of MFP for ISO test suites.

To find out more visit: www.virsoftech.com

 

 

 

Improve inkjet output quality with PrintFlat™

If you print on an inkjet press you’ll know that the problem of non-uniformity or banding is a particularly difficult one to resolve. It’s especially acute on areas of flat tints with the result that printed output is unacceptable to you and to your customers. This means you either don’t run certain jobs on your inkjet press or, in some sectors of the market, are forced to sell your output at a discount.

The good news is that with PrintFlat you have a solution that is quick to deploy and cost-effective, and it can be applied to any workflow with or without a RIP. With more press vendors adopting this technology, watch our new explainer video to see how you might benefit.

Find out more about PrintFlat here.