How to retain print quality with vector-based transparency flattening

This week, Mako™ product manager David Stevenson explains vector flattening:

When you print PDF content or save or export it to other formats that do not support transparency, it will need to undergo a process called flattening. Flattening usually involves rasterizing areas of the page that are subject to transparency effects, which could mean replacing sharp-edged vector content with a jagged-edged bitmap. Of course, increasing the resolution of the rasterization can mitigate that problem, but doing so takes longer and adds to file size.

The alternative is to retain vector geometry, including text, as vector objects. This requires dividing the artwork down into smaller parts that no longer overlap, then tracing the edges of the new shapes with a vector path. In the latest release, Global Graphics Software’s Mako Core SDK (v6.2.0) adds this capability to its raster-based transparency flattening API. Using existing APIs that apply De Casteljau’s algorithm to decompose Bézier curves and a new method to trace around shapes, flattened content can retain its device independence and printing quality.

In this example, two partially transparent shapes overlap, and set to use a multiply blend. The rectangle indicates the zoom area for the next two images.
In this example, two partially transparent shapes overlap, and set to use a multiply blend. The rectangle indicates the zoom area for the next two images.
The result of regular raster-based flattening. The shapes are rasterized (at somewhat low resolution for the purposes of illustration) and you can see the jagged edges that result.
The result of regular raster-based flattening. The shapes are rasterized (at somewhat low resolution for the purposes of illustration) and you can see the jagged edges that result.
The result of vector-based flattening. The edges are smooth.
The result of vector-based flattening. The edges are smooth.
This image shows how the vector flattener has created three new vector paths that no longer overlap (moved apart for the purposes of illustration), with the color of 2 representing the blend evident in the original artwork.
This image shows how the vector flattener has created three new vector paths that no longer overlap (moved apart for the purposes of illustration), with the color of 2 representing the blend evident in the original artwork.

I’ve included a short demo of the vector-based transparency flattening feature using Mako here:

Don’t hesitate to david.stevenson@globalgraphics.com for more information if you’d like to know more about the feature and Mako Core.

Further reading

  1. Carry out complex tasks for your print workflow easily with Mako
  2. Improving PDF accessibility with Structure Tagging

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Ditch the disk: a new generation of RIPs to drive your digital press

Vast amounts of data can slow down your digital press resulting in wasted product or delayed delivery times.
Vast amounts of data can slow down your digital press resulting in wasted product or delayed delivery times.

In this post, Global Graphics Software’s product manager for Mako, David Stevenson, explores the challenge of printing large amounts of raster data and the options available to ensure that data doesn’t slow down your digital press:

The print market is increasingly moving to digital: digital printing offers many advantages over conventional printing, the most valuable of these is mass-produced, personalized output making every copy of the print different. At the same time  digital presses are getting faster, wider, and printing at higher resolutions with extended gamut color becoming common place.

To drive the new class of digital presses, you need vast amounts of raster data every second. Traditional print software designed for non-digital workflows attempts to handle this vast amount of data by RIPping ahead, storing rasters to physical disks. However, the rate at which data is needed for the digital press causes disk-based workflows to rapidly hit the data rate boundary. This is the point where even state-of-the-art storage devices are simply too small and slow for the huge data rates required to keep the press running at full rated speed.

This is leading to a new generation of RIPs that ditch the disk and RIP print jobs on the fly directly to the press electronics. As well as driving much higher data rates, it also has the benefit of no wasted time RIPping ahead.

As you can imagine, RIPping directly to the press electronics presents some engineering challenges. For example, two print jobs may look identical before and after printing, but the way in which they have been made can cause them to RIP at very different rates. Additionally, your RIP of choice can have optimizations that make jobs constructed in certain ways to RIP faster or slower. This variability in print job and RIP time is a bit like playing a game of Russian roulette: if you lose the press will be starved of data causing wasted product or delivery delays.

With a RIP driving your press directly you need to have confidence that all jobs submitted can be printed at full speed. That means you need the performance of each print job and page to be predictable and you need to know what speed the press can be run at for a given combination of print Job, RIP and PC.

Knowing this, you may choose to slow down the press so that your RIP can keep up. Better still, keep the press running at full speed by streamlining the job with knowledge of optimizations that work well with your choice of RIP.

Or you could choose to return the print job to the generator with a report explaining what is causing it to run slowly. Armed with this information, the generator can rebuild the job, optimized for your chosen RIP.

Whatever you choose, you will need predictable print jobs to drive your press at the highest speed to maximize your digital press’s productivity.

If you want to know more about the kind of job objects and structure that can slow RIPs down, and the challenge of producing predictable jobs, download this guide: Full Speed Ahead – how to make variable data PDF files that won’t slow your digital press.

You can also find out more about software to optimize both PDFs and non-PDFs for your digital press by visiting our website.

Further reading:

Is your printer software up to the job? The impact of rising data rates on software evolved from traditional print processes 

Future-proofing your digital press to cope with rising data rates

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Mako™ 5.0 offers a wealth of new features

We’ve recently released Mako™ 5.0, the latest edition of Global Graphics Software’s digital document SDK. Mako 5.0 earns its major version increment with an upgrade to its internal RIP, new features and a reworked API to simplify implementation. Much requested by Mako customers, Mako 5.0 is the first version to preview C# as a coding alternative to C++ and opens the possibility to support other programming languages in future versions.

Mako 5.0 enables PostScript® (including EPS) files to be read directly, extending the PDL (page description language) support in Mako that already includes PDF, XPS, PCL5 and PCL/XL. Mako can read and write all these PDLs, enabling bi-directional conversion between any of these formats.

With the update of Mako’s internal RIP has come new EDS (error diffusion screens) using algorithms such as Floyd-Steinberg and Stucki. All the screening parameters are exposed via this API, and to help define them, a Windows-based desktop tool can be downloaded from the Mako documentation site. Start with settings that match the popular algorithms and preview the monochrome or color result of your settings tweaks. Then use the settings you have chosen via a button that generates the C++ you need to paste into your code.

Mako 5.0 offers several new APIs that extend its reach into the internals of PDF. For example, it’s now possible to edit property values attached to form and image XObjects. Why is this useful? In PDF, developers can put extra key-value pairs into PDF XObject dictionaries. This is often used to store in application-specific data, as well as for things like variable data tags. This development has led to a more generalized approach to examining and modifying hard-to-reach PDF objects. As ever, well-commented sample code is provided to show exactly how the new APIs work and could be applied in your application.

Finally, we took the opportunity with Mako 5.0 to make changes aimed at making the APIs more consistent in their naming, behavior or return types. Developers new to Mako will be unaware of these changes, but existing code written for Mako 4.x may require minor refactoring to work with Mako 5.0. Our support engineers are ready to assist Mako customers with any questions they have.

For more information contact David Stevenson: david.stevenson@globalgraphics.com

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Mako™ – the print developer’s Swiss Army knife

Mako - the Swiss Army knife of SDKs!
Mako – the print developer’s Swiss Army knife.

Working with a Mako customer recently, I showed him how to code a utility to extract data from a stack of PDF invoices to populate a spreadsheet. I suppose you could describe it as reverse database publishing. This customer had originally licensed Mako to convert XPS to PDF, and later used it to generate CMYK bitmaps of the pages, i.e. using it as a RIP (raster image processor).

With this additional application of Mako, the customer observed that Mako was “like a Swiss Army knife” as it offered so many tools in one – converting, rendering, extracting, combining and processing, of pages and the components that made them up. And doing it not just for PDF but for XPS, PCL and PostScript® too. His description struck a chord with me as it seemed very appropriate. Mako does indeed offer a wide range of capabilities for processing print job formats. It’s not the fastest or feature-richest of the RIPs from Global Graphics Software – that would be Harlequin®. Or the most sophisticated and performant of screening tools – that would be ScreenPro™. But Mako can do both of those things very competently, and much more besides.

For example, we have used Mako to create a Windows desktop app to edit a PDF in ways relevant to production print workflows, such as changing spot colors or converting them to process colors. All the viewing and editing operations are implemented with Mako API calls. That fact alone emphasizes the wide range of applications to which Mako can be put, and I think, fully justifying that “Swiss Army knife” moniker.

For more information visit: www.globalgraphics.com/mako

Unlocking document potential

Using Mako to pre-process PDFs for print workflows follows quite naturally. With its built-in RIP, Mako has exceptional capability to deal with fonts, color, transparency and graphic complexity to suit the most demanding of production requirements.

What is less obvious is Mako’s value to enterprise print management (EPM). Complementing Mako’s support for PDF and XPS is the ability to convert from (and to) PCL5 and PCL/XL. Besides conversion, Mako can also render such documents, for example to create a thumbnail of a PCL job so that a user can more easily identify the correct document to print or move it to the next stage in a managed process. Mako’s document object model (DOM) architecture allows content to be extracted for record-keeping purposes or be added to – a watermark or barcode, for example.

Document Object Model to access the raw building blocks of documents.

The ability to look inside a document, irrespective of the format of the original, has brought Mako to the attention of electronic document and records management system (EDRMS) vendors, seeking to add value to their data extraction, search and categorization processes. Being able to treat different formats of document in the same way simplifies development and improves process efficiency.

Mako’s ability to analyse page layout and extract text in the correct reading order, or to interpret and update document metadata, is a valuable tool to developers of EDRMS solutions. In the face of GDPR (General Data Protection Regulation) and sector-specific regulations, the need for such solutions is clear. And as many of those documents are destined to be printed at some point in their lifecycle, they exist as discrete, paginated digital documents for which Mako is the key to unlocking their business value.

If you would like to discuss this or any aspect of Mako. Please email justin.bailey@globalgraphics.com

Convert from PDF & XPS formats with Mako™

Product manager David Stevenson provides an update on the latest release of Mako:

We’ve just released Mako version 4.6 and I’m pleased to let you know that new in this release is support for PCL5 input, adding to the PCL/XL support already available. Aimed primarily at the enterprise print market, this capability makes it possible to convert to and from PDF & XPS formats and to render thumbnails for preview purposes.

This latest release will also be of interest to our prepress customers: we’ve  improved overall performance and added new, fast render-to-buffer capability, in monochrome and color.

Finally, there is also new and improved support for PDF-named destinations, document metadata and more.

Contact me to find out more: david.stevenson@globalgraphics.com

David Stevenson
David Stevenson,
Product Manager

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