Harlequin RIP gains Ghent PDF Output Suite 5 compliancy

We’ve just added the Harlequin RIP® to the list of products certified as compliant with the Ghent Workgroup’s Output Suite 5 at https://www.gwg.org/ghent-pdf-output-suite-5-compliancy/

It was an interesting exercise, not because it was difficult, but because we started with a bit of archaeology. Back in February 2003 we published an “Application Data Sheet” of instructions for configuring versions 5.3 and 5.5 of the Harlequin RIP to render PDF/X-1a files. We followed that up with another edition for Harlequin 6 (the Eclipse release), addressing PDF/X-3 as well in 2004, and then for Harlequin 7 (Genesis) in 2005.

After that it seemed that PDF/X was sufficiently well understood and so widely adopted in the marketplace that we didn’t need to continue the series. Added to that, we’d added the ability for Harlequin RIPs to recognize PDF/X files and automatically change the RIP configuration around things like overprinting to, as we phrased it at the time, “Do the Right Thing™”.

So when we started writing up how to configure Harlequin for the GWG Output Suite we simply opened up the 2005 doc and replaced the screen grab of the user interface in Harlequin MultiRIP with a one from Harlequin 12.1. In 14 years we’ve added a few options, and, of course, a Windows 10 dialog looks a bit different to one from Windows XP!

We did have to add a couple of extra bullet points to the instructions, especially around perfecting the color management of spots being emulated in process colorants. Some of our color focus over the last decade has been on outputting to a fixed ink set, whether that’s on a digital press or for flexo or offset. So we made the point by delivering our sample output to be reviewed by the GWG as a CMYK raster file … and yes, all of the spot colors in the test suite showed up correctly in their emulations, it all passed 100%.

But that was it.

We thought about adding an indication of which RIP versions the instructions applied to, but ended up simply pointing out when a configuration item had been changed from a check-box to a three-way drop-down menu. The instructions will give you good output from all Harlequin RIPs shipped by Global Graphics in the last decade, and into the future as well.

I love it when stuff just works, and continues to just work, like this. There’s definitely a benefit to aiming to Do the Right Thing™!

Harlequin RIP® gains Ghent PDF Output Suite 5 compliancy
Harlequin RIP® gains Ghent PDF Output Suite 5 compliancy

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Future-proofing your digital press to cope with rising data rates

When we hear the phrase “big data”, we’re meant to think of extremely large data sets that are too complex to process in traditional ways. But, in the context of the next generation of digital presses, you’d be forgiven for thinking it refers to the ultra-high data rates required to drive them.

For example, consider a typical narrow-web label press: 13 inches (330mm) wide, 4 colors, 600x600dpi, running at 230 fpm (70m/min). This requires 0.9 GB/s of raster data to drive it at its rated speed.

Assuming next year’s press adds three more colors (Orange, Green and White) and is upgraded to 1200x1200dpi and expected to run a little faster at 330 fpm (100m/min), the required data rate will jump to 8.6 GB/s: almost a factor of ten increase!

Already this is a data rate far in excess of what the fastest solid-state drives can manage, so what hope is there for a traditional disk-based workflow when moving to 20 inches wide, duplex or 200m/min? Clearly, any part of the workflow involving a disk drive is going to become a bottleneck.

Ditch the disk with Direct
Ditch the disk. Rather than write intermediate raster files to disk between RIPping and screening, or between screening and the printhead electronics, everything takes place in memory.

This was one of the reasons behind the creation of Direct™, the integrated software pipeline we announced at the end of April. Rather than write intermediate raster files to disk between RIPping and screening, or between screening and the printhead electronics, everything takes place in memory.

There’s more to future-proofing your press than eliminating comparatively slow disk accesses, however. You’ll need a system that’s scalable and built from the fastest components, which is why Harlequin Direct™ is composed from a configurable number of Harlequin Host Renderer™ and ScreenPro™ instances working in parallel to make the best of the most powerful desktop PCs available.

When it comes to adding new colors or supporting duplex, the scalability extends to multiple Harlequin Directs across multiple PCs, one per print bar.

When it comes to adding new colors or supporting duplex, the scalability extends to multiple Harlequin Directs across multiple PCs, one per printbar.

An added advantage of this approach is that each printbar need not use the same resolution or drop-count etc. For example, you might wish to use a lower resolution and disable color management for white or varnish. Our Press Operator Controller user interface is supplied to manage your configuration, along with submitting and controlling your print jobs.

Our Press Operator Controller user interface is supplied to manage your configuration, along with submitting and controlling your print jobs.

The beauty of a software-only solution like Direct is that once you have built it into your workflow, you are free to upgrade your PCs over time for greater performance without any further software integration expense. A Direct-based system will evolve as your needs evolve, making it the ideal choice for future-proofing your next digital press.

For more information about Direct, please visit globalgraphics.com/direct.

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Ian Bolton, Product Manager, Direct
Ian Bolton, Product Manager, Direct

About the author:
Ian has over 15 years’ experience in industry as a software engineer focusing on high performance. With a passion for problem-solving, Ian’s role as product manager for the Direct range gives him the opportunity to work with printer OEMs and break down any new technology barriers that may be preventing them from reaching their digital printer’s full potential.